Why I’ve abandoned Witty Article Titles

Back in 2015, I published an article about paratext.  About teaching music students the importance of paratext, to be accurate.  But my title was too flippant – evidently “double entendre” belongs between friends, but not in a contents page!  It didn’t attract as much attention as it deserved, possibly for that reason.

Nonetheless, I still think it was a good article.  Pity I can’t retrospectively change that title, though!

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Hosting a library visit, 23 August

If you’re a librarian in CILIP’s ARLGS (Academic and Research Libraries Group Scotland), then do come and see us at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland’s Whittaker Library on 23 August.  Visit us, then go on to see the Piping Centre library just over the road on Cowcaddens.  Booking details here:-

CV – evidence of a research life

Someone close to me suggested that Issuu would be a good platform on which to host a CV, so I tidied mine up and did as suggested!  I think it does show that I’ve been quite research-active, given that I’m only a researcher 1.5 days a week.  Sometimes I look at other people’s profiles and feel that I really haven’t done very much – but I’m NOT full-time faculty, or a tenured academic, and I have to remind myself that most of what I’ve done has been fitted in around a different career-path, mainly during the decade since I graduated with my mid-career PhD.

I suppose that makes me “alt-ac”, though I’ve never really embraced that concept.  I’m as “ac” as my limited research time allows me to be!

Dr Karen E McAulay CV 2019

Slow Teaching: Jamie Thom’s Philosophy

Slow TeachingI found educationalist Jamie Thom on Twitter a few weeks ago.  I was actually searching for helpful hints about how to revise for exams – I can’t remember the exact route by which I found Jamie, but I immediately recognised this as a book I had to read:-

Thom, Jamie, Slow Teaching: on Finding Calm, Clarity and Impact in the Classroom (2018)

It’s £15 on Amazon, where you can “look inside” the book, and sure enough, there’s a chapter on revision. But the whole book is worth a look.  It’s written from the stance of secondary education, whereas I’m working in higher education, but good pedagogy is good pedagogy, and there is much to benefit from for anyone involved in teaching.  The author had a fairly rapid rise into school management, experienced burnout, and is now a classroom teacher in the North of England.  Novice teachers will find plenty of advice about how to avoid overdoing things and setting impossible targets for oneself!

Website: Slow Teaching

Twitter: @TeachGratitude1

UPDATE: I wrote a mini-review for Times Higher Education, and it appeared in the issue for 16 May 2019.  You can read it here:  you don’t have to be a subscriber to access this link, but you may need to register for your three free articles a week.

Student Reactions to Assessments – and how to Respond

40 percent

Here’s a blogpost I spotted on Twitter, shared by educationalist Phil Race.  It’s by Suzanne Fergus, who is Associate Professor of Learning and Teaching @UniofHerts. National Teaching Fellow, SFHEA.

It offers many practical suggestions as to how a lecturer might effectively, sympathetically – and constructively – respond to a student’s disappointment about an assessment grade that they feel does not reflect their efforts.  Well-worth reading!

“I am not happy with my mark” – Tough! 

by Suzanne Fergus

I'm a musicologist disguised as a librarian. I'm qualified in music, librarianship and education. I began this blog when I was studying for my PGCert in Learning & Teaching in Higher Arts Education, and I'm now using it for CPD. I'm a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. Midweek I am continuing the research I commenced as PI for an AHRC-funded research network @ClaimedStatHall – early legal deposit music. Off-duty I'm hard-wired into my sewing machine!