All posts by Karenmca

I'm a librarian and musicologist, currently seconded part-time as postdoctoral researcher at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. I'm also a church organist and choir-trainer. Last year, I completed a PG Cert in Learning and Teaching in Higher Arts Education. Addicted to music and fabric. You can find me on Twitter @karenmca

Coffee and Collaboration

Readers of this blog will recall that I spoke about training students in effective electronic resource research at the ARLGS (Academic and Research Libraries Group, Scotland) teach-meet a couple of weeks ago.   In a timely confluence of meetings and publications, my article on the same topic has just been published in my professional association’s journal: ‘Coffee and Collaboration’ appears in the Nov/Dec 2018 issue of Information Professional, published by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.  I’m a chartered Fellow of CILIP, but I don’t think I’ve ever had more than a single-column news announcement in this journal before, so I’m quite pleased to have achieved this in my final decade before retirement!

Coincidentally, yesterday afternoon saw me arranging the second iteration of this information literacy training for early next year.  And so the wheel comes full circle ….!

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Knowledge Exchange: a Busy Week

“Join us on the afternoon of Tuesday the 20th of November to share best practice in teaching and training with other information professionals. You’ll hear from a range of speakers about their experiences and innovations in teaching, training, and delivering information skills in academic libraries, with the opportunity to ask questions and participate in discussion. Refreshments will be provided.”

glasgow
Glasgow University Library (image from Copac website)

UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW – SCOTTISH LIBRARIANS

This week, I attended a TeachMeet at the University of Glasgow, organised by ARLGS (Academic and Research Libraries Group Scotland).  One of eight speakers, I spoke about the very successful two-part seminar that I and a teaching colleague ran for third year B.Ed students last session, contrasting it with a slightly less successful Mendeley installation session a couple of weeks ago!  (The Mendeley demo went fine – it was installing it onto a myriad of different devices and operating systems, during a seminar in a tiered lecture theatre, that was the problem …!)

There were plenty of new and innovative ideas at the teachmeet – ways to teach students about referencing, literature reviews and similar topics – an afternoon well-spent.  I must remember to go through my notes, as I always remember more if I revisit what I’ve written.

SORBONNE, PARIS – MUSICOLOGY RESEARCH

I returned to my desk to find an invitation to speak at a seminar at the Sorbonne in Paris next May, this time about one of my research interests – I shall have to go back to my notes and see what more I can add to the information that appeared in my thesis and subsequent book!

ICELAND UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS LIBRARIANS

And then this morning, it was my turn to exchange knowledge with visiting librarians from Iceland University of the Arts – as always we found much in common, although it was also interesting to spot the differences in provision, too.

Suddenly, here we are at the end of the week again.  It has been a busy one!

Can I write a set of strathspeys?

Well, I made a valiant attempt, anyway! My set of strathspeys is called, whimsically, “My Foot Has Gone to Sleep” – partly because I really prefer watching dancing to actually doing it, so the title is just one of my excuses for not joining in!  Having said that, this weekend I found I would have to play Clavinova rather than organ at church (an electrical problem), so both my feet had a rest.  I played my strathspeys after a more sedate voluntary.  No-one passed any comment, so who knows if they didn’t notice or were too polite to say they didn’t like it!

The computer-generated audio file for violin, acoustic bass and guitar is horribly artificial-sounding, so I hope that one dayMusard Cherubs Quadrilles someone will play the piece and I’ll have something more human-sounding!

My Foot Has Gone to Sleep

Summarising Library Resource Seminars

I’ve recently given seminars on catalogue and database searching to all our traditional music students, and to our first year B.Ed. students.  Biteable animations are proving a fun way to summarise what they’ve learned with me.  They have a certain sheer surprise value, too.  (Today, the speakers were set louder than I’d expected, so they surprised me, too!)

 

Animating a Bibliography? Yes, for sure!

Edinburgh Legal Deposit Music Research – Brief Bibliography

I’m looking forward to giving a talk to students at the University of Edinburgh this week.  The University Library was one of the recipients of legal deposit materials during the Georgian era, before the law changed in 1836.  Amongst all the learned tomes and textbooks, they received sheet-music too.  The interesting question, of course, is what they did with it!

Now, as you know, I’m a bit of an enthusiast when it comes to bibliographies, but this time I’ve prepared a very minimal bibliography in a novel format.  Don’t worry, all the necessary details are on the big, definitive bibliography page on the Claimed From Stationers’ Hall blog.

HAPPINESS IS …WRITING A BALLAD

magpie-2364332__340Not content with setting old folk-tunes, this weekend I decided to go one further and write a ballad.  Yes, the whole thing.  Seventeen verses and a couple of different tunes, so the setting uses tune A for a few verses, then B for a few more, and finally back to A again.  We have all the ingredients for a classic ballad – a lovelorn lass, a motherless child, a lone father … and a couple of Glaswegian magpies.  (They exist – I can show you the tree and chimney pot where I spotted them on my way to the bus-stop last Friday morning!)

magpie tree skyI was asked to write something for voice, flute, violin, piano and guitar / accordion.  I’ve done so.  Personally, I think it would be best to have either piano OR guitar / accordion, but not having heard it played by live musicians, I’m willing to be proved wrong.  Here’s the computer audio-file – unfortunately you can’t hear any words!  But if you listen right to the end, you’ll get an audible hint as to how the story ends!

Jackdaw-Jo : a Ballad

Happiness is … an unaccompanied tune!

There are three strands to my professional self: librarian, musicologist and educator.  But there’s a fourth strand which stays at home – creativity.  That’s not to say, of course, that I’m not creative at work, but I don’t get the opportunity to sew or arrange tunes during my working day!

During my doctoral studies, I encountered Georgian Scottish song-collector Alexander Campbell, of Edinburgh (and the Highlands).  The tunes he collected are in a 2-volume collection called Albyn’s Anthology.  There are some lovely tunes, but his accompaniments are pretty dire.  (Sorry, Alexander, but they are!)  I have had very many hours of innocent pleasure arranging them for small instrumental ensembles.  This week I was challenged to arrange something for soprano and flute, and I ended up with this: ‘The Lone Wanderer‘.

A bit of background: the poet of this tragic song was “Anon” (maybe tune-collector 2018-10-02 10.06.41Alexander Campbell himself?), and he set it to an “ancient Lowland melody” that he had collected on his song-collecting travels. The lyrics tell the story of a girl who went out of her mind with grief, when her fiance was taken from her on their wedding day. The theme is strongly reminiscent of a very popular song, “Crazy Jane.”

Whether he died, was conscripted, or some other disastrous circumstance, is entirely up to the listener’s imagination in the present song.

Campbell went on two song-collecting tours in Scotland in 1815 and 1817, publishing a song collection after each trip. It is with relief that I ditched his accompaniment for this one and wrote an alternative flute accompaniment!

I decided to put some of my arrangements on Sheet Music Plus – they’re all here if you’re interested!