Category Archives: CV and CPD

E-Portfolios

Something came up on my Twitter feed this evening – it looked interesting, so I’ll share it here, and read it when I’ve got a spare minute later on this week.  It’s about e-portfolios, and it’s from our friends at Jisc.  (They’re the team who ran Copac before upgrading it to Jisc Library Discover, earlier this summer.)

How to enhance student learning, progression and employability with e-portfolios

Case studies and guidance on e-portfolios for UK further and higher education (July 2019)

I believe I may have mentioned that one of our sons suggested I should follow his example and turn my CV into an Issuu e-publication – well, I did do that, but I wonder if we’ll be revising our efforts after I’ve looked at this!

CV – evidence of a research life

Someone close to me suggested that Issuu would be a good platform on which to host a CV, so I tidied mine up and did as suggested!  I think it does show that I’ve been quite research-active, given that I’m only a researcher 1.5 days a week.  Sometimes I look at other people’s profiles and feel that I really haven’t done very much – but I’m NOT full-time faculty, or a tenured academic, and I have to remind myself that most of what I’ve done has been fitted in around a different career-path, mainly during the decade since I graduated with my mid-career PhD.

I suppose that makes me “alt-ac”, though I’ve never really embraced that concept.  I’m as “ac” as my limited research time allows me to be!

Dr Karen E McAulay CV 2019

2015 Retrospective

If I were a young American academic, I’d be writing frantically in my efforts to secure tenure.  But I’m neither young nor American, and I identify both as a librarian and an academic: I sit on the fence between music librarianship and musicology.

Despite all this, I feel it’s good for my academic profile to get as much published as possible, so with that in mind, and the fact that only 40% of my work-life is spent on research, here’s my 2015 retrospective.  To put it in context, October saw the end of my Bass Culture postdoc secondment, so I was busy finishing off that, and writing/speaking was often centred on the project and its resultant website.  Public engagement seems to be a regularly recurring theme, which pleases me.  There’s no point in doing research if it stays locked up in an ivory tower.

PUBLICATIONS

  • ‘Wynds, Vennels and Dual Carriageways: the Changing Nature of Scottish Music’, chapter in forthcoming book edited by Gary West and Simon McKerrell, Understanding Scotland Musically (pending)
  • Scottish Musical Review (pending) ‘Scottish Airs in London Dress: Vocal Airs and Dance Tunes in Two 18th Century London Collections’
  • Box & Fiddle Magazine 39.1 (Sept 2015), 7, ‘Bass Culture in Scottish Musical Traditions’
  • Post-Lib (CILIP Retired Members Guild) no.76 (1 June 2015), 3-4, ‘From Where I Sit’
  • Reference Reviews (pending), ‘Show me a Strathspey: Taking Steps to Digitize Tune Collections’ http://www.emeraldinsight.com/loi/rr
  • Fontes Artis Musicae Vol.62.1 (2015), 17-25, ‘Following the Bass: a New Digitisation Project for Scottish Fiddle Tune Resources
  • Library Review Vol.64, Iss.1/2, (2015), 154-161, ‘Sexy Bibliography (and Revealing Paratext)’ http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/LR-09-2014-0104
  • Reference Reviews, Vol.29 no.3 (2015) 41, Review of Nardolillo, Jo, illustrated by T. M. Larsen and edited by David Daniels, All Things Strings: an Illustrated Dictionary (Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014)
  • Reference Reviews, Vol. 29 no.1 (2015) 47-49, Review of Collins, Irma H., Dictionary of Music Education (Lanham: Scarecrow Press, 2013), DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/RR-07-2014-0186
  • Times Higher Education. What are you reading? 9 contributions to this column since 2012.

PAPERS AND TALKS

  • Scots Fiddle Festival, Edinburgh, ‘Fiddle books by the dozen’ (Nov 2015)
  • Edinburgh Central Library, ‘An Entertainment Altogether New: a celebration of Edinburgh’s First Musical Festival’ [Bicentenary of the first Edinburgh Musical Festival held between 30th October and 05th November 1815] (Oct 2015)
  • Royal Conservatoire of Scotland Exchange Talk: ‘Common Threads: From Sacred to Secular, Ancient to (nearly) Modern’ (Oct 2015)
  • Dundee Central Library, Speaker at Friends of Wighton series of Cappuccino Concerts: ‘The Importance of the Wighton and Jimmy Shand Collections’ (Sept 2015)
  • University of Glasgow, Speaker at Robert Burns Song Project Symposium (September 2015)

Apologetic Postnominals: See Me? See My Letters!

PostnominalsI was looking at someone else’s website the other day.  If I thought I had a lot of postnominals, they had – ooh, easily three times as many, the whole width of their web-page.  They were Fellows of a vast number of societies, only one of which I’d ever heard of. Now, not all Fellows are equal: I worked hard to attain my FCLIP, and was elected into the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. The academic, music and librarianship qualifications were all earned after a lot of blood, sweat and tears.  However, it set me wondering.  There’s a place for postnominals, but maybe one can overdo it.  Suffice to say, for the first time I found myself embarrassed, not because I’m well-qualified, but because those hard-earned postnominals may come across as showing off – an almost paranoid demonstration of one’s own worth.  Or am I becoming tainted with the Scottish “I kennt his faither” tendency, which basically translates as “who do they think they are?”