Professional Reading: Scaffolded Learning (in the Australian TeacherMagazine.com)

I get regular emails from this online magazine – it has some very useful articles.  Try this one:-

Dawn Castagno-Dysart, Bryan Matera, and Joel Traver, ‘The importance of instructional scaffolding‘ (TeacherMagazine.com – 30 April 2019)

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Slow Teaching: Jamie Thom’s Philosophy

Slow TeachingI found educationalist Jamie Thom on Twitter a few weeks ago.  I was actually searching for helpful hints about how to revise for exams – I can’t remember the exact route by which I found Jamie, but I immediately recognised this as a book I had to read:-

Thom, Jamie, Slow Teaching: on Finding Calm, Clarity and Impact in the Classroom (2018)

It’s £15 on Amazon, where you can “look inside” the book, and sure enough, there’s a chapter on revision. But the whole book is worth a look.  It’s written from the stance of secondary education, whereas I’m working in higher education, but good pedagogy is good pedagogy, and there is much to benefit from for anyone involved in teaching.  The author had a fairly rapid rise into school management, experienced burnout, and is now a classroom teacher in the North of England.  Novice teachers will find plenty of advice about how to avoid overdoing things and setting impossible targets for oneself!

Website: Slow Teaching

Twitter: @TeachGratitude1

UPDATE: I wrote a mini-review for Times Higher Education, and it appeared in the issue for 16 May 2019.  You can read it here:  you don’t have to be a subscriber to access this link, but you may need to register for your three free articles a week.

Student Reactions to Assessments – and how to Respond

40 percent

Here’s a blogpost I spotted on Twitter, shared by educationalist Phil Race.  It’s by Suzanne Fergus, who is Associate Professor of Learning and Teaching @UniofHerts. National Teaching Fellow, SFHEA.

It offers many practical suggestions as to how a lecturer might effectively, sympathetically – and constructively – respond to a student’s disappointment about an assessment grade that they feel does not reflect their efforts.  Well-worth reading!

“I am not happy with my mark” – Tough! 

by Suzanne Fergus