Tag Archives: Presentations

Professional Engagement – Part of my Identity!

Piano badge
Conference badge (Library Camp Glasgow)

The past month has been something of a whirlwind!  I’ve been to four conferences, been to a seminar, convened a plenary, had a couple of pieces published in the IAML(UK and Ireland) Newsletter, and done the blogposts you see here.  What I haven’t done is update my CPD record on my professional association’s virtual learning network.  Not that I haven’t done any CPD (as you see, I’ve done plenty!), but because I’ve had no time to do the updating!

  • 20-21 October: Understanding Scotland Musically, AHRC-funded conference at the University of Newcastle.  I gave a paper: ‘Wynds, Vennels and Dual Carriageways: the Changing Nature of Scottish Music’.  Subsequently invited to submit abstract for proposed book.
  • 25 October (Saturday): Musical Life outside London, 1500-1800, University of Newcastle.
  • 29 October: Seminar at the University of St Andrews (as invited guest, not speaker).
  • 6 November: Convened SALCTG Plenary at Glasgow Caledonian University.
  • Glasgow Mitchell Library8 November (Saturday): Library Camp Glasgow, Mitchell Library.  Gave presentation, ‘Do you Practise what you Preach?’, and one-minute rant, ‘Diigo and Me’.
  • 11 November,  IAML (UK and Ireland) Newsletter: no.69, 2014, pp.14-16,  ‘Raising the Bar: a Targeted User Education Policy’; also my report of the IAML Conference in Antwerp this July: ‘Ian Ledsham Bursary Recipient Report, pp. 4-7.
  • 13-15 November: ELIA Biennial Conference (European League of Institutes of the Arts, at the Royal Concert Hall.NeuNow2014 henhouse exhibit

Clearly, I need to sit down and read through the notes and tweeted observations I made at this week’s big conference, not to mention updating my CV with the presentations I gave, and so on.  Right now my brain feels a bit like your stomach feels after Christmas dinner.  Lots of good stuff to digest, but in danger of indigestion!

An Evening of Quiet Reflection and Consolidation

Bass Culture at Musica ScoticaQueen's College Camb

After a hectic few weeks, I need to update my CV with recent papers and presentations.   I maintain an Academia.edu presence; and since Research Gate is a good discussion forum, I upload what I can there, too.  I want my research profile to be as good as it can be.  I work full-time; while the boys were small, I didn’t do much scholarly writing or presenting.  Since doing the PhD part-time in my spare time, I’m making up for lost time.  None of this is directly related to my studies for the Teaching Artist course, but it is all part of the package that is me, so I wanted somehow to weave it into this e-portfolio.  For that reason, I’ve given my CV its own page on this blog.

  • March 2014. ‘Scottish, Scotch and Caledonian: the many shades of Scottish Music’ – RMA Scottish Chapter, Colloquium, Glasgow.
  • April 2014. ‘Learning to Teach, and Teaching to Learn: is there a Place for Pedagogical Theory in Teaching Bibliographic and Research Skills?’ – IAML(UK & Irl)* Annual Study Weekend, Cambridge.
  • April 2014. Quick-Fire Session: ‘Effective Use of Social Media’ (ibid)
  • April 2014. ‘Scottish Airs in London Dress’ – Musica Scotica, Aberdeen.
  • And in July I’m giving a paper at the ‘big’ international IAML Conference in Antwerp – not my first paper at an international conference, but Antwerp feels more ‘abroad’ than Dublin, so it’ll be exciting all the same:  ‘From Historical Collections to Metadata: a Case-Study in Scottish Musical Inheritance’

What else will I add to the CV?  I’ve been given one of the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland places to attend the 13th ELIA Biennial Conference (entitled, ‘Location Aesthetics’) from 13-15 November this year – an event which I’m eagerly anticipating, because I’ve thought quite a lot about Scottishness, Scottish places and origins and culture, in connection with my own research.

There are various other opportunities I’ve come across which would be useful in a research or a self-development context, and I recently submitted an abstract for another conference – about Scottishness in music – but I wouldn’t share these until, or unless, there’s a chance that they might actually happen.

I’ve published nothing yet this year.  I have two encyclopedia articles pending publication, and I’ve submitted a substantial paper to a professional journal, but it really is time I started writing something else.   I haven’t made things easy for myself by trying to be as professionally active a musicologist and librarian, as if I were two people doing these activities full-time!

 

Too Tired to Type?

Today, I’ve admitted to myself I’m overtired, something I very seldom admit to.  I should explain that in the past fortnight I’ve given a paper and two quickfire sessions at the IAML (UK and Ireland) music librarians’ annual study weekend in Cambridge; attended my first IAML Exec meeting at the British Library in London (also fitting in a trip to the Tate, for the RuinLust exhibition); and given a scholarly paper at Musica Scotica in Aberdeen, finishing up with playing at a church dedication service this morning.  Oh, and I’ve spent a few days at work in both my library and research capacities too.  So finally, on Sunday evening, I find I can’t think straight – not a good time to tackle the Teaching Artist backlog of reading.

Karen has met the new Tate Britain

However, I have been reflecting about giving research papers.  In March I gave a talk, with absolutely minimal notes, at an RMA (Royal Musical Society) Colloquium. I was pleased with it, and peer comments were very favourable.  And yet yesterday’s talk, written a full three months earlier and revised this week, was so densely packed with facts and figures that there was no way I’d be able to stand and just “speak” the paper. I was talking about a number of 18th century music books, precise dates (down to the day and the month), and commentary from the late 19th and early 20th centuries – it was very detailed!  I looked up at different areas of the audience, a lot. But I freely admit I “read” much of it.  I’d marked it with highlighter pen, gone over it several times – but I didn’t have time to reduce it to skeletal form, which is the only way I’d have stood a chance of a freer, less constrained delivery.

This Teaching Artist course has made me much more aware of good pedagogical practice.  I suppose it’s fair to point out that giving a research paper at a conference is NOT teaching in the conventionally accepted way.  Sharing research findings is a different activity from preparing to teach a class, involving them, getting feedback and monitoring whether they’ve learned what you set out to teach them.  But I’m now rather perturbed.  Because my delivery of yesterday’s paper, which my research Principal Investigator says was good, and which received favourable comments from several delegates, leaves me feeling flat and disappointed.  There was nothing wrong with the content, or the structure of what I said.  But I was deeply envious of a colleague who just stood, and delivered, seemingly without notes at all.  What is WRONG with me?!

I wondered if perhaps the answer was that the paper would have been better as a publication – something that might yet happen – and maybe I need to produce something more discursive for research presentations.  At the same time, what do scientists do?  They quite possibly have even more detailed, fact-and-figure-heavy findings than my own.  And what about mathematicians, or statisticians?

The RMA Presentation

The Glasgow end of the Bass Culture Research Project is doing a presentation for this week’s Royal Musical Association meeting at Glasgow Uni.  After the team-leader introduces the project, we’re each talking for ten minutes about an aspect of the project that we find interesting.  This is presenting, not teaching – it can be attended by RMA members or staff and students at the University, but it’s not part of a curriculum.

I’m puzzled, now.  The format is essentially, a progress report focusing on the interesting bits.  I don’t need anything written down apart from key names and dates.  Discussion may well arise after we’ve each presented.  But I can’t see a way of making an individual progress report anything other than me, talking.  Really not a flipped classroom opportunity!