Note to self:- Gagne’s 9 Events of instruction

Gagne’s 9 Events of Instruction made a lot of sense when I encountered them last year on my Teaching Artist short course, so I am quoting them here to remind myself of them:-

Gagne’s 9 Events of Instruction (click for original link on University of Florida website)

  1. Gain attention
  2. Inform learners of objectives
  3. Stimulate recall of prior learning
  4. Present the content
  5. Provide “learning guidance”
  6. Elicit performance (practice)
  7. Provide feedback
  8. Assess performance
  9. Enhance retention and transfer to the job

As I mentioned earlier this weekend, the other theoretical background I particularly liked was that of constructive alignment, so – I shall be re-reading this to refresh my memory:- John Biggs’ ‘Aligning Teaching for Constructing Learning’.  For my proposed lesson plans,  ILOs (Intended Learning Outcomes), the place of Assessment, and choosing TLAs (Teaching and Learning Activities), will all be central to the process.

The link already in my Resources is this:- Biggs, John,  ‘Aligning teaching for constructing learning‘ (the summary from a document dated 21.03.2003, reproduced by The Higher Education Academy in their Resources pages, via EvidenceNet.). I also looked at Warren Houghton’s ‘Constructive Alignment – and why it is important to the learning process’ (Chapter 6, p.27, in a Higher Education Academy subject guide to teaching and learning theory for engineering lecturers).  Both links have changed since we were given them last year, so I’ve updated them here and in my resource list.  You can take a scholar out of the library, but you can’t take the librarian out of the scholar …

There are four essential requirements for my forthcoming week, as far as the PGCert is concerned: see the Scottish music course handbook; mug up some theory; decide what is to be shared with the students and what they need to learn from it; and write two lesson plans.  Do-able?  I’ll soon find out!

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